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Clipper Sailing Ships

Much of the information on this page comes from
THE COLONIAL CLIPPERS by Basil Lubbock
 
Clipper Sailing Ships
 
The Power of Gold
Emigrant Ships to Australia in the Forties.
Report on Steerage Conditions in 1844.
The Discovery of Gold in Australia
Melbourne and its Shipping 1851-2
 
Aviemore 
Blue Jacket
Centurion 
Champion of the Seas 
Cutty Sark
Donald Mackay
Ethiopian
Heather Bell 
James Baines
Jerusalem 
John Bunyan
Maid of Judah
Nineveh
Orient 
Red Jacket
Schimberg
Thyatira 
 
Walter Hood
White Star
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tall Ships 2007 Wall Calendar

 

 

HEATHER BELL

 

In 1855 Hall, of Aberdeen, built the little Heather Bell for brown & Co., from whom the Orient Line bought her. Her measurements were:

 

Registered Tonnage

479 tons

Length

155 ft

Beam

28.5 ft

Depth

17.5 ft

 

She was not one of the south Australian traders, however, but ran regularly to Sydney and Melbourne. She made herself famous by a wonderful run home form Melbourne under Captain William Harmsworth. She left Port Phillip Heads on 15th October, 1856, with a strong easterly wind and took the route down the West coast of Tasmania. In spite of five days of easterly gales, she made the passage to the Horn in 26 days. The record for this run was made by the Lightning in 1854, being 19 days. She ran from the Horn to the line in 21 days. This was a record, and considered such a remarkable performance that it was pricked off on old South Atlantic charts. And so far as I know, it has only been twice beaten, once by the Cutty Sark and once by the Thomas Stephens. Heather Bell made the land at Start Point 20 days from the line, thus making a passage of 67 days. Her best 24 hour run was 330 miles. Of course she had great luck with her winds, but, even so, she proved herself a very speedy ship.

Heather Bell had a long life of 39 years, and was finally broken up at Balmain, Sydney, in 1894.

 
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10/04/2006