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Clipper Sailing Ships

Much of the information on this page comes from
THE COLONIAL CLIPPERS by Basil Lubbock
 
Clipper Sailing Ships
 
The Power of Gold
Emigrant Ships to Australia in the Forties.
Report on Steerage Conditions in 1844.
The Discovery of Gold in Australia
Melbourne and its Shipping 1851-2
 
Aviemore 
Blue Jacket
Centurion 
Champion of the Seas 
Cutty Sark
Donald Mackay
Ethiopian
Heather Bell 
James Baines
Jerusalem 
John Bunyan
Maid of Judah
Nineveh
Orient 
Red Jacket
Schimberg
Thyatira 
 
Walter Hood
White Star
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tall Ships 2007 Wall Calendar

 

 

JERUSALEM

 

These wooden clippers were often very tender coming home with wool, as the following reminiscence given by Coates in his Good Old Days of Shipping will show: “Apropos of Jerusalem, I remember a most exciting race with the large American ship Iroquois. We were homeward bound from the Colonies, flying light and very crank, a not uncommon condition with a wool cargo. The Yank was first sighted on our quarter, and wind being quarterly, blowing moderately, though squally at times.

“Whilst the wind remained so the Iroquois had no chance, but when it freshened the Jerusalem heeled over to such an extent that it necessitated sail being taken in. Soon the American was ploughing along to leeward carrying her three topgallant sails and whole mainsail and going as steady as a die, whilst the Jerusalem was flying along with fore and main lower top-gallants and reefed mainsail, but heeling over to such a degree that one could barely stand upright, the water roaring up through the lee scuppers, and during the squalls lipping in over the rail.

“In a short time the topgallant sails and mainsail were handed and preparations made to reef the fore topsail. By this time, however, the Iroquois had just passed the beam, when, apparently, her skipper, satisfied to have passed us, snugged his ship down to three reefed topsails and we shortly after lost sight of her in a blinding squall.”

And Coates goes on to say: “To see this ship qhen moderately light was a great pleasure, her lines were the perfection of symmetry. In one day I remember 324 miles being got out of this ship; she was one of the first to carry double topgallant yards.”

As a matter of fact, the Jerusalem was generally considered the fastest ship in the fleet next to Thermopylae. She made several very good passages from China in the seventies of under 110 days. Captain Crutchley, in his book My Life at Sea, gives an instance of her speed, in describing how she raced ahead of the tea clipper Omba, both ships being bound up the Channel with a strong beam wind. On this occasion, however, it was the Omba which was the tender ship, as she could not carry her royals though the Jerusalem had all plain sail set.

 
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10/04/2006