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Clipper Sailing Ships

Much of the information on this page comes from
THE COLONIAL CLIPPERS by Basil Lubbock
 
Clipper Sailing Ships
 
The Power of Gold
Emigrant Ships to Australia in the Forties.
Report on Steerage Conditions in 1844.
The Discovery of Gold in Australia
Melbourne and its Shipping 1851-2
 
Aviemore 
Blue Jacket
Centurion 
Champion of the Seas 
Cutty Sark
Donald Mackay
Ethiopian
Heather Bell 
James Baines
Jerusalem 
John Bunyan
Maid of Judah
Nineveh
Orient 
Red Jacket
Schimberg
Thyatira 
 
Walter Hood
White Star
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tall Ships 2007 Wall Calendar

 

 

Report on Steerage Conditions in 1844.


    Nearly everyone has read of the horror of the convict ships, but the following ~report of steerage~ conditions in 1844 plainly shows that in many respects ~ the emigrant's lot was every bit as hard and revolting

    "It was scarcely possible to, induce the passengers to sweep the decks after their meals or to be decent . in respect to the common wants of nature; in many ,cases, in bad weather, they would not go on deck, .. - their health suffered so much that their strength. was gone, and they had not the power to help them - selves. Hence the between decks were like a loathsome dungeon. When hatchways were opened, under which , the  people were stowed, the steam rose and the stench was like that from a pen of pigs. The few beds they had were in a dreadful state, for the straw, once wet with sea water, soon rotted,  ,besides which they used the between decks for all sorts of filthy purposes. 'Whenever vessels put back from distress, all these miseries and sufferings were exhibited in the most -aggravated form. In one case it appeared that; the vessel having experienced rough weather, the people were unable to go on deck and cook their pro- visions: the strongest maintained the upper hand over the weakest, and it was even said that there were women who died of starvation. At that time the passengers were expected to cook for themselves and from their being unable to do this the greatest suffering arose.  It was naturally at the commencement of the voyage , that this system produced its worst' effects, for the ". ~first days were those in which the people suffered  most from sea-sickness and under the prostration of body thereby induced were wholly incapacitated from cooking. Thus though provisions might be abundant enough, the passengers would be half starved. .
This terrible report was given before a Parliamentary Committee.


 A Shipping Notice of 1845

It does not even mention the overcrowding which took place, owing to the smallness of the ships," which can well be realized by the  following shipping  notice taken from a Liverpool newspaper of January, 6" . 1845.

NEW SOUTH WALES.
Will be despatched immediately :- For PORT PHILLIP and SYDNEY, New South Wales.
The splendid first-class English-built ship

"
ROSSENDALE,"
EDWARD DAVIDS GOULDING, C:ommanner.
A I at Lloyd's, 296 tons per register, copered and copper fastened, and well known as a remarkably fast sailer . This vessel has spacious and elegant accommodation for passengers, replete with every convenience and presents a first rate opportunity.
For terms of freight and passage apply to
MESSRS. FAIRFIELD, SHALLCROSS & Co.

 
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10/04/2006