Schooner Vocabulary
Dictionary of Boating Terms

Dictionary of Boating Sailing, Schooners, Naval, Ships, Boat and Seafaring Terms

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BENDS  and HITCHES 

    
BENDS. - Common Bend (PI. 4, fig. 6). - Pass the end of a rope through the bight of another rope, then round and underneath the standing part; but to prevent it jambing, pass it round again under the standing part. The'sheet of a sail has the end passed up thraugh the clue, then round the clue, and underneath 1!he standing part. The rope of a buoy is passed as a sheet, and has the end stapped. Bends of a Cable Clinch are passed as a seizing. (PI. 6, fig. 3)
. Carrick Bend (PI. I, fig. I). - Lay the cnd of a rope or hawser across its standing part; then take the end of another rope or hawser, and lay it under the first standing part, at the cross, and over the end; then through the bight under the standing part; then over its own standing part, and underneath the bight again. It is aften used in haste, to. form a greatcr length to. warp ar tow with. 
Fishermen's Bend (PI. I, fig. 3). -Take a raund-turn with the end of a rope ar hawser through the ring of an anchar, or round a spar, &c., and a half-hitch through bo.1:h parts, and anather half-hitch round the standing part; then stD.p the end. Hawser Bend (PI. I, fig. 4) is a hitch, with a .' throat and end-seizing made on one end, and the end of ano1!her hawser rove through the bight, and hitched with another throat and end-seizing.  
Temporary Bend
W1. I, fig. 2). - Commonly made to reeve through large blocks, thus: - Lay three fathoms of the.: end of two hawsers together, and put on a round-seizing in the middle; then reverse the ends to each standing part, and put on a throat-seizing between each end and the middle, and a round-seizing on each end.

Clove-hitch (PI. I, fig. 10) is two half-,hitches one at the back of the other, made by the ratlings round the shrouds, and by buoy-ropes round anchors
. Blackwall-hitch (PI. I, fig. 11).- Take the end of a rope, or fall of a tackle, round the back of a tackle-hook, and jamb it underneath the standing .part. 
Half-hitch
(PI. I, fig. 3). - Pass the end of a rope over the standing part,. and through the bight, and lay it up to the stand- ing part, and repeat it for two half-hitches.
  Magnus-hitch (PI. I, fig. 17). - Take two round-turns through. the ring of an an- chor, &c., and bring the end over the standing part, then round the ring and through the bight.
Racking-hitch,
for shortening slings (PI. I, fig. 6). - Lay the bight over both parts, and turn it over several time?; then hook the tackle through the bights. 
Rolling-hitch
(PI. I, fig. 14). - Take two round-turns round a' mast, &c., and make two half-hitches on the standing part. 
Timber-hitch
(PI. I, fig. 12). -Lay the end over the hauling part, and pass it through the bight; then take several turns round the standing part, and stop the end. The bight serves as a sling for bales, drawing of timber, &c.
Most of the copy and pictures on this page came from a very early edition of the The Art of Rigging we have not taken the time to proof where the commuter has misread the type. For information on a new copy of 
The best manual ever produced on rigging a sailing ship, based on extensively revised and updated 1848 edition prepared by Biddlecombe, Master in the Royal Navy. Complete definition of terms, on-shore operations, process of rigging ships, reeving the running rigging and bending sails, rigging brigs,

  The Art of Rigging
by Captain George Biddlecombe, George Biddlecombe


Temporary Bend W1. I, fig. 2). - Commonly made to reeve through large blocks, thus: - Lay three fathoms of the.: end of two hawsers together, and put on a round-seizing in the middle; then reverse the ends to each standing part, and put on a throat-seizing between each end and the middle, and a round-seizing on each end.

Temporary Bend

Carrick Bend (PI. I, fig. I). - Lay the cnd of a rope or hawser across its standing part; then take the end of another rope or hawser, and lay it under the first standing part, at the cross, and over the end; then through the bight under the standing part; then over its own standing part, and underneath the bight again. It is aften used in haste, to. form a greatcr length to. warp ar tow with.. Fishermen's Bend (PI. I, fig. 3). Take a raund-turn with the end of a rope ar hawser through the ring of an anchar, or round a spar, &c., and a half-hitch through bo.1:h parts, and anather half-hitch round the standing part; then stD.p the end. Hawser Bend (PI. I, fig. 4) is a hitch, with a .' throat and end-seizing made on one end, and the end of ano1!her hawser rove through the bight, and hitched with another throat and end-seizing.

Carrick Bend

Fishermans Bend

 

Hawser Bend

 
Sheepshank a way a rope can be temporality shorten Sheet Bend An ideal knot to join to ropes of unequal thickness.  

Sheepshank

Sheet Bend 

 
Racking-hitch, for shortening slings (PI. I, fig. 6). - Lay the bight over both parts, and turn it over several time?; then hook the tackle through the bights. Clove-hitch (PI. I, fig. 10) is two half-,hitches one at the back of the other, made by the ratlings round the shrouds, and by buoy-ropes round anchors . Blackwall-hitch (PI. I, fig. 11).- Take the end of a rope, or fall of a tackle, round the back of a tackle-hook, and jamb it underneath the standing .part.

Racking Hitch

Clove Hitch

Blackwall Hitch

Timber-hitch (PI. I, fig. 12). -Lay the end over the hauling part, and pass it through the bight; then take several turns round the standing part, and stop the end. The bight serves as a sling for bales, drawing of timber, &c. Half-hitch (PI. I, fig. 3). - Pass the end of a rope over the standing part,. and through the bight, and lay it up to the stand- ing part, and repeat it for two half-hitches Rolling-hitch (PI. I, fig. 14). - Take two round-turns round a' mast, &c., and make two half-hitches on the standing part.

Timber Hitch

Two Half Hitches

Rolling Hitch

 
     
 
Most of the copy and pictures on this page came from a very early edition of the The Art of Rigging we have not taken the time to proof where the commuter has misread the type. For information on a new copy of 
The best manual ever produced on rigging a sailing ship, based on extensively revised and updated 1848 edition prepared by Biddlecombe, Master in the Royal Navy. Complete definition of terms, on-shore operations, process of rigging ships, reeving the running rigging and bending sails, rigging brigs,

  The Art of Rigging
by Captain George Biddlecombe, George Biddlecombe

 

 

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02/10/2008