Schooner Vocabulary
Dictionary of Boating Terms

Dictionary of Boating Sailing, Schooners, Naval, Ships, Boat and Seafaring Terms

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Tackle


TACKLE. - The number of parts of the fall of a tackle is more or less, in proportion to the effects intended to be produced. That part of the fall which is fastened to one of the blocks is called the standing part, and the other parts of it are called the running part. (PI. 7, figs. 2 and 3). Tackles are used to stretch the rigging in the house, &c., to raise or remove weighty bodies, to support the masts, extend the rigging, or expand the sails. They are either moveable, as connecting with a runner, or have one part fixed to an immoveable station by a hook, lashing, &c. A tackle is a convenient kind of purchase, but subject to much friction. I~s power will be (the friction not considered) as the number of the parts of the fall that are applied to sustain the weight. If a tackle consists of a double and a single block, as pI. 7, fig. 3, and the weight to be hoisted is 'huFlg to the single block, there will be four parts of the fall; and the weight resting upon four ropes equally stretched, each must,bear the same part of the weight. Thus, suppose the weight -hung to the single block be 4 cwt., then I cwt. applied to the hauling .part of the fall will suspend it; and, if as IJ;ludh more power be applied as will overcome the friction, it will purchase the weight; but had the weight been hooked to the double block, it would have rested on three ropes only, each, of which would bear one-third of the weight; therefore one:.third of the weight being applied to the
58

PREPARATORY RIGGING

hoisting part of the fall, would suspend the weight when hooked to the double blocks; and as much more power being applied as will overcome the friction, would purchase the weight. Ropes, if tight laid, will not easily bend round small sheaves, but will take up a considerable part of the power to force them into their proper direction; hence it follows, that blocks with small pins, large sheaves, and slack-laid ropes, are the best materials to obviate friction and make tackles with. The blocks that are fixed, commonly called leading-blocks, are only for the conven- ience of turning the direction of the fall; they add nothing to the power of the purchase, but, on the contrary, destroy so much as is necessary to overcome their friction, and are therefore to be avoided as mllch ,as possible. It may be here remarked, that the blocks of all the standing and running rigging are generally strapped and p"repared in the house.
The.Anchor-stock Tackle is composed of a double block and a single block, strapped with a hook and thimble. Boom Tackles are composed of double and single blocks, strapped with tails. Bowline Tackle is composed of a long tackle and a single block, strapped with a hook and thimble. Burton Tackles are com- posed of double and single blocks, and are used with pendants. A Fish Tackle is composed of a long tackle and a single block, strapped with eyes, and is used with a pendant. (PI. 6, fig. 4). Jigger Tackles are composed of double and single blocks, strapped with tails. A Long Tackle is composed of two blocks, - a long tackle-block, and a common single-hook block. The long-tackle block is double, but it resembles two single blocks, joined together at their ends. (PI. 7, fig. 3). Luff Tackles are composed of double and single blocks, strapped with a hook and thimble. Outhauler Tackle is composed of two single blocks, strapped with tails. Quarter Tackles are composed of a double block, strapped with eyes, and a single block with a hook and thimble, having a long strap. Reef Tackles (PI. 13, figs. 22 and 33) are composed of two single blocks; one block has a thimble seized to it, which the reef tackle is rove through, and the other is strapped with an eye round the top-sail yard-arm, if the sister block is not used. Relieving Tackles are the same as luff tackles. . Ridge Tackle is composed of a double block and single block, strapped with an eye. Rolling Tackles are the same as luff tackles. Rudder Tackles are composed of long tackle blocks

59

and single blocks, strapped with hooks and thimbles. Runner Tackles are composed of double and single blocks and a pend- ant; the lower blocks are strapped with a hook and thimble. Stay Tackles, main and fore, are composed of double and single blocks: the double blocks are spliced into a pendant; the single blocks have a long strap, like pL 9, figs. 48, 49,50. The pendants have. a span from the fore to the main. Stay-sail stay Tackles are composed of double and single blocks; the lower blocks are strapped, with a hook and thimble. Pre venter Backstay Tackles are composed of double and single blocks, strapped with a hook and thimble, except they are fitted with runners. Tack Tackle is composed of a double 1\nd single block, strapped with hooks.
and thimbles. The Top Tackle is composed of double and treble blocks" (PI. 9, figs. 15 and 16). It is strapped with hook and thimble, and hooks to the top-rope pendant; generally iron- bound. Truss Tackles are composed of one single or double block, strapped jn the truss pendant. Winding Tackle is com- posed of a fDur-fold and a treble block, or a treble and a double block, strapped with eyes, and toggles to the winding tackle pendant. (PI. 2, fig. 21) . Yard Tackles are composed of dou- ble and single blocks; the double blocks are spliced into the lower ends of pendants, and the single blocks are strapped with hooks and thimbles. (PI. 10, figs. 5 and 6).

Most of the copy and pictures on this page came from a very early edition of the The Art of Rigging we have not taken the time to proof where the commuter has misread the type. For the compete book order a new copy from Amazon 
The best manual ever produced on rigging a sailing ship, based on extensively revised and updated 1848 edition prepared by Biddlecombe, Master in the Royal Navy. Complete definition of terms, on-shore operations, process of rigging ships, reeving the running rigging and bending sails, rigging brigs,

  The Art of Rigging
by Captain George Biddlecombe, George Biddlecombe

 

 

 

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02/10/2008