Schooner Vocabulary
Dictionary of Boating Terms

Dictionary of Boating Sailing, Schooners, Naval, Ships, Boat and Seafaring Terms

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Harbor -A safe anchorage, protected from most storms; may be natural or man-made, with breakwaters and jetties; a place for docking and loading.
Hard over - turning the wheel as far as possible
Halyards: - lines used to haul up the sail and the wooden poles (boom and gaff) that hold the sails in place.hanks -- metal hooks used to secure a sail to a stay; to hank on a sail is to hook it on a stay using the hanks
hard over -- turning the wheel as far as possible
harden up -- to steer closer to the wind, usually by pulling in on the sheets
Hatch:- an opening in the deck for entering below.
haul around -- change from a run to a reach
hawse hole-A hole in the hull for mooring lines to run through.
Head-ship toilet 2Also the upper corner of a triangular sail.
Head to Wind - the bow turned into the wind, sails luffing
Heading -The direction in which a vessel's bow points at any given time.
Heads up- watch out
Headsails: -any sail foreward of the foremast.
Headstay - a wire support line from the mast to the bow
Headway -The forward motion of a boat. Opposite of sternway
Heave to -To bring a vessel up in a position where it will maintain little or no headway, usually with the bow into the wind or nearly so.
Heel -To tip to one side. .
Helm-steering apparatus
Helmsman - the member of the crew responsible for steering
Hike - leaning out over the side of the boat to balance it
Hitch -A knot used to secure a rope to another object or to another rope, or to form a loop or a noose in a rope.
Hoist - to raise aloft
Hold: - the space for cargo below the deck of the ship
HoggedA vessel whose bow and stern have dropped.
Hook- anchor
Horse/traveler-Metal or rope traveler to sheet a sail.
hull The main body of the boat, not including the deck,mast or cabin.
hull speed - the fastest a sailboat will go, usually dependent on length of the hull at the waterline the longer the faster
Hurricane-A strong tropical revolving storm of force 12(65 mph) or higher . Hurricanes in the northern hemisphere  revolve in a counterclockwise direction.
Hypothermia -- the loss of body heat -- is the greatest danger for anyone in the water. As the body loses its heat, body functions slow down. This can quickly lead to death.

 
 

 

 
 
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Schoonerman Schooner Introduction  Sea Tale Books Sales Maritime History Data Bases
Maritime Links -  Maritime @ Seafaring Art Sailing Videos Finding a Berth on a Tall Ship
Clipper Ships 2003 TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE GREAT LAKESl  Site  of the Week @ Links Figureheads on Sailing Ships
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Dinghy and Other Small Boats   Schooner Vocabulary 

05/09/2010