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TeVega

2 masted gaffrigged topsail schooner

loa 156'

beam 28'

draft 17'1/2,

(aprox 10,500 ft sail)

Flint school owned ship in'74-'81, I was there 3 yearsTeVega (you say 1905, i thought 1930, but Kiel is right)steel hull,
Antony Lineberger
wolf66@earthlink.net

In 1995 TeVega changed hands and restoration work was undertaken first at the Bilbao shipyards and then at the Beconcini shipyards in La Spezia, Italy. The goal of the very meticulous restructuring work, whilst maintaining the style and technology of the time, was above all to produce a comfortable and functional yacht, suitable for long cruises.

It has now taken to the seas again, powered by a 700 hp Mtu diesel engine and with its Maltese Cross Class 100 A 1.1 Y. conferred by RINA to yachts of prestige and aimed at rewarding the efforts of shipbuilders competing in an increasingly demanding market.

News Source: http://www.rina.it/material/news/rina_news/news26.html For many more historical pictures and details of TeVega: http://www.enterpriseintegrators.com/flint/HistoryOfShips/index.htm    I thank Palmer Stevens <palmer.stevens@enterpriseintegrators.com> for this information 8 Nov 2000

Sat, 13 Jun 1998 16:43:38 -0500
From: " Capt. Jeff Berry" <calljeff@HK.Super.NET>
Regarding the Te Vega, my recollection is that the vessel was German built, owned by Herman Goering who named it after his Swedish wife's name backwards. She was called Etak, then (Kate, his nickname for her). She went to the States as a war prize after WWII. She was sold to Capt. Omar Darr, who sailed passengers and freight to and from Honolulu and Tahiti for a number of years. She later was used by Stanford University as a research vessel off the California coast. That was in the early 1960s. Sorry, but I don't remember anything else about Te Vega.

Regards, Jeff Berry

Thu, 19 Feb 1998 13:24:10 EST
From: JPHamilton@aol.com

Te Vega was at one time owned by my grandfather, Thomas Hamilton. Her name had been just "Vega". About 1950 she was sold to an owner out of Tahiti. As conditions of the sale, the hull color was changed from black to white and deck houses were added. The actual transfer was in Hawaii, and my father, some friends (and and some professional crew) delivered her. As "Te Vega" she was rumored to have been dismated in Tahiti and delivered back to Hawaii under power. Recently, my brother found a print of her as "Vega" (black hull, no deck houses) on the Trans-Pac. Do you know where I can find more info on trans-pac participants and/or her current whereabouts?
Thank You! John Hamilton
P.S. Grandpa had another (lesser) schooner - Vagrant....any info?

Subject: TeVega

Date: Sat, 02 Jan 1999 21:57:17 -0500

From: Lawrence & Debra Trim <PAGE-TRIM@worldnet.att.net>

Hello Schooner man,

I worked on the TeVega when it was owned by Mr. Harold Miller and captained by Capt. Willoby in the early 60's. I joined the boat in 1960 and left the boat in 1962 under the leadership of Capt. Boisen. Capt.Boisen was from Sweden. I had a wonderful time on this boat. We sailed the Atlantic Ocean and Carribean Sea mostly visiting the two dozen islands in he Carribean chain. We carried famous guests such as Anita Edberg. I was the chef on the boat but had alot of fun helping with the sail, etc. on deck. When I sailed her, she had a white hull. We were encouraged to enjoy our selves with the guests often inviting steel bands to play on deck as we barbecued foods for our guests. The boat was leased to a university in Carlifornia for pacific research. I sailed on the Windsong (36 foot Sloop) and the Windward Star (a 50 foot sloop). The most fun I had during my youth was on the TeVega. If you find out any other information about this ship, I would be glad to hear it.   Sincerely,  Lawrence Trim, Sr.

Thu, 11 Feb 1999 03:07:30 -0500

jsjostrom@tribune.com wrote:>

 I've been searching for information the Te Vega on the Internet and elsewhere on and off for a long time, and just recently found your entry on novagate.

In the summer of 1961 I worked on the schooner Te Vega as a below-decks steward, looking after the charter passengers and waiting on the officers table. That summer on the Te Vega in the Caribbean remains the adventure of a lifetime. So you can imagine, it was quite a thrill to encounter your Website entry.

Having said that, I wonder if my Te Vega and yours are the same ship. The one I worked on was said to be 135 feet long, and your listing indicates a length of 156 feet. Also, the Te Vega had no deckhouses, just raised roofs of the cabins, in 1961. `My' Te Vega was said to be built by Krupp in Germany. In 1961 it was based at English Harbor, Antigua, and carried charter passengers on one-week cruises in the Windward & Leeward Islands. It was represented by R.E.B. Nicholson charter agents, of English Harbor, and It was owned by one Mr. Miller, of Oregon or Washington state.

It had a crew of seven sailors plus captain, first mate, second mate, engineer, pursar, two cooks, chief steward, assistant steward (me), and mess boy. There were usually 10 or 12 passengers but on one short cruise (5 or 6 days) the ship was> chartered just one man! The officers and sailors were all from Sweden. The sailors were teenage boys who attended a maritime acedemy in Sweden and at certain intervals left school to work on ships. > At the end of the summer of 1961, Te Vega sailed to Oyster Bay, NY, where it was to undergo conversion from a gaff rig on both masts to a staysail rig. I sailed along to New York, via Bermuda, and flew home > to Chicago from there.

> I next heard of the Te Vega in 1965, when my father sent me a clipping from a local southwest side Chicago newspaper saying a local boy was aboard the Te Vega in the Pacific on some kind of work/study   program. From then, I heard nothing about Te Vega until 1994, when I saw an ad in Wooden Boat magazine placed by Bruce Boal, a yacht broker with J.A > Consultants, of Antibes, France, requesting information on the Te Vega.

> In response to my letter, Mr. Boal wrote that the Te Vega had fallen into disrepair, but that new owners were putting a lot of money into making her shipshape again and were seeking information on the boat's history. So, I wrote him a long letter about my experience on Te Vega and spent $10 or $15 making reprints from black & white negatives of photos I took on Te Vega. I sent these to Mr. Boal, but never received an acknowledgement from him. A year or two ago I wrote to Mr. Boal inquiring about the status of Te Vega but the letter was returned. I can't find any Internet listings for J.A. Consultants.

In 1959 my family moved from our home in Chicago to San Juan, Puerto Rico. My father was a civil engineer and had taken a job as the architect's representative on construction of slaughterhouse and meat packing plant in Caguas, P.R. > In May 1961, I was finishing my sophomore year in high school, the > packing plant was completed, and we were preparing to move back to Chicago. I saw an ad in the English-language San Juan Star newspaper for a mess boy on the Te Vega, which was docked in San Juan at the time. I went down and applied and was hired, thought as it turned out  > they hired somebody else to be mess boy (dishwasher and kitchen cleanup) and assigned me to be assistant steward (clean up passengers' cabins, wait on the officers' table etc etc etc.) The school year wasn't over, so the Te Vega bought me an airplane ticket to Antigua, where I met the ship a few weeks later. The ship was gaff rigged then, however the main had been blown out in a storm and was replaced by a triangular sail. Even that smaller sail was enormous. It was raised by a halyard wrapped around an electric winch, and the halyward looked as tight as a piano wire while pulling up the sail. > Well, I was a pretty naive kid about the world of work, the world of adults, etc etc, so in some respects I had a fairly tough summer. On the other hand, when I returned to Chicago, I was the only one of my > peers who had ever heard of the Grenadines, Anguilla, or Fort de> France, Martinique, let alone been there.

Do you want to know more? Send me a message, or write snail mail or
bulletJoe Sjostrom
bulletChicago Tribune, City Desk
bullet435 N. Michigan Ave.
bulletChicago IL 60611
bullet312-222-3540
bulletjsjostrom@tribune.com

 

From: "TIMOTHY L ANDERSON" <TSULLAN@prodigy.net> CC: <schoonerman@novagate.com> I read a request of yours,at the Schooner Man site, for information on TeVega. As noted by Captain J. Berry I also had heard that she was built at the Krupp yard in Germany in 1930 and she was a prize of war. The owner at the time I was aboard her from Sept. l988 - June 1999 was a dutch gentleman. I believe his name was Samara. At the time I sailed with her, she was being used by the Watermark Program at the Landmark School in Beverly Farms, Massachusetts which specializes with working with dyslexic students. I was employed as a school teacher and crew member. We had a crew of 17 and 32 students. Captains Steve Wedlock and later Neils Lindiger. We sailed from Amsterdam to Vigo, Spain; St. Malo, France, the Mediteranean - Ibiza, Menorca, Almeria, etc. then to Tenerife, Canary Islands. From there we sailed 17 days to the Caribbean - Antigua, St. Barts., Isle de Saint, St. Kitts and maybe a few more. Then to Bermuda and New York. You'll find a nice article in the November l986 SAIL magazine, author J. Tevere MacFadyen. I quote from page 104. "Built in 1930 at the Krupp Yard in Kiel, Germany, TeVega was initially commissioned as a private yacht for a member of the New York Yacht Club. She is steel hulled, with wooden top-sides and spars. One hundred thirty-four feet on deck from stem to stern, she weights 400 tons, draws 17 feet, and has a 28-foot beam. For auxiliary power she relies on a venerable and cranky English-built slow-turning diesel that drives her slim hull at 9 knots. She's named after Vega, the evening star, and an apocryphal legend perpetuated on board contends that Pacific islanders impressed by her handsome lines added the adjectival prefix Te, meaning beautiful, before her name. TeVega has had a checkered career. Like so many large vessels, once she passed out of private hands she had to work for a living. She's been chartered in the Caribbean and between Tahiti and Hawaii; she carried copra in the pacific, ferried passengers on the Amazon, and served as an oceanographic research vessel for Stanford U. in the Indian Ocean. Since the early 1970's she's been a school ship." I hope this information is helpful to you.

 

To: <schoonerman@novagate.com>

I worked as a teacher aboard TeVega l988-1989 when she was used by the Landmark School in Beverly Farms,MA as a sail-training vessel and school ship for 18 students. The owner at the time was a man from the Netherlands. We began our year in Amsterdam and sailed to many ports over the next 9 months. These included Vigo,Spain; St. Malo, France; Ibiza, Menorca, Almeria, Tenerife. We then sailed transatlantic, 17 days, to Antigua. We sailed in the Caribbean for a few months - St. Barts, Isle de Saint, St. Kitts, BVI's,. Then we were off the St. Georges, Bermuda and ended in New York.

Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 17:59:25 -0500

 

JSAnderson

Sat, 26 Dec 1998 17:18:04 +0100

From: "Andrea" <abarbieri@atlantis.tm>

Now Te Vega is owned by Calisto Tanzi of Parma (Italy) a tycoon involved in both food and travel business. From: "Julia Sullivan Anderson" <janderson@prsd.org>

Sun, 05 Sep 1999 19:59:27 -0700

From: Wesley Fielding <wfieldng@jps.net>

,

In the summer of 1964 I had the pleasure of being aboard Te Vega when she sailed from Mombasa, Kenya, to Singapore under the auspices of Stanford University. We were a scientific expedition studying the Deep Scattering Layer, i.e. the D.S.L., of the ocean, a sonar layer deep in the sea which  moves up and down with the daylight and nighttime hours. We dragged a fine net many thousands of feet down, catching organisms we thought were the cause of the DSL. We established, with our work, that the organism was a siphonophore an organism that is light sensitive. The work was later published.

The boat traveled across the Pacific stopping at the Seychelle Islands, The Maldive Islands, and Sri Lanka. At each stopping point we also collected reef fish to identify and catalogue. The trip was about eight weeks in length and ruined my life forever because I have never since found anything exciting, romantic, and adventurous to do with my life that comes anywhere close to my Te Vega Adventure. We were five faculty members, twelve marine biology students, and a crew of fifteen. My job was a combination of faculty member and ship's physician. At the time I was a practicing anesthesiologist in Carmel, California. The members of that trip are, many of us, still in constant contact with each other even though we made the trip thirty-five years ago.

The trip changed my life entirely and I remain grateful to the boat, its builders, and Stanford University. Wesley Fielding, M.D.

Lakeport, California

 

     

Interesting to see your information on TeVega. It filled in a lot of historical blanks that I was not aware of. I sailed on her from August 1970 through 1973. I participated in the shakedown cruise shortly after the Flint School bought her. Owners George Stoll and his son Capt. Jim Stoll. The Flint School was a private land based school from Sarasota, FL that movedaboard the TeVega in the fall of 1970. If my memory is right the first students met the ship in Bimini or another of the Bahamas Islands. From: The TeVega and TeQuest sailed together beginning late fall 1972. I was first officer on her from '72 to '73. The owner George Stoll and a small crew, of I think 6, sailed her from Ft. Lauderdale to Rotterdam, Holland. In Rotterdam, the three steel masts, rigging and sails were added. New deck boards, caulking and gallons of paint and varnish were applied. Needless to say the TeQuest crossed the Atlantic under power with much difficulty, a sextant, weather facsimile and a prayer. Dthriftusa@aol.com 10 Oct 1999 18:54:09 EDT

Wed, 19 Jan 2000 11:03:48 -0600
From: "Jeffrey A. Barach" jbarach@home.com

It was with great pleasure that I was directed to your web page. I sailed on the Vega (later Te Vega), as a galley boy (serving meals to the crew and assisting the cook), when I was 16 in 1951. She had been acquired by Mr. Cornelius Crane (hier of the plumbing fortune) who sailed her from Los Angeles to Tahiti & Bora Bora while I was on board. He had acquired her after she had been used during the war as an at sea look-out ship, being rolled about in the Pacific swells. He had a big deckhouse and galley added. She had white topsides at time. Our captain was the legendary Capt. Flint. We took 12 passengers to Tahiti, with a crew of 18, I think. In Tahiti she was transfered to French registry to act as a passenger ship between Hawaii and Tahiti -- air service was only to Bora Bora and mostly charter. On the way down we reached 15 - 17 knots at one point but the lee rail was well under water at the time and we flooded the main engine and one generator, so the captain did not indulge in that much fun again. The transfer of registry took months and I had to leave the ship to go back to school. When Vega left Tahiti in December I later learned that she had a catastrophe at sea, the main mast having broken off at the deck, killing 2 and injuring many others. I was told she was still in Tahiti 4 years later, still having metal work done on her hull. I was told that none of the big schooners carried topmasts any more and that the stress on the masts from rolling about while looking for Japanese subs, etc., must have been severe. When on her shakedown cruise from Long Beach, CA to Hawaii (that's how my summer started) with some paid and some corinthian crew, we poped a main topmast backstay and at a diferent time, the bobstay. After that, the cook said this ship was going to have a wreck and that was too much strain on the rigging. He was a terrible pessimist, but this time he was right.

I have met several who have sailed on her as students and teachers, cooks, etc., during here school ship years. I've just seen some recent pictures and will send PK Stevens some of my photographs from the summer of 1951. She was, according to my memory, 150' tall, 136' long (hull), 22' wide and 12' deep. She had a 200 hp motor and a couple of generators. We made 6+ knots under power and a bit more in the normal breezes of the mid-Pacific.

From: "Jeffrey A. Barach" jbarach@home.com

 

 

From: Douglas Thomas <drthomas@neteze.com>

Date: Monday, January 15, 2001 8:19 PM

I sailed on Te Vega in 1965-66 just after her cruise from Mombasa to Singapore by way of the Seychelles, described by Wesley Feilding. She was sailing bald-headed, her top-masts shipped presumably due to earlier incidents described elsewhere.

 

Her owner at the time was John Hopkins Marine Lab in Monterey CA, an offshoot of Stanford University. During the time I was aboard the captain was Omar Darr, who previously owned her during her Honolulu-Tahiti days.

 

We did some research in Monterey Bay in a large volume of water near the Monterey Marine Canyon which was strangely deficient in oxygen. During that time Te Vega also underwent extensive refitting at Bethleham Shipyard in San Francisco.

 

The (excellent) cook was caught smoking marijuana at the top of the mainmast, and fired. His replacement was a short, crew-cut sailor from 30 years at MSTS and at our first reprovisioning I counted eight cases of canned peas being loaded aboard. I tendered my resignation. Still, the time aboard Te Vega was idyllic and I still remember it well. I sometimes wonder if that piece of leather I crafted for the boom cradle is still there...

<drthomas@neteze.com>

I sailed on Te Vega in 1965-66 just after her cruise from Mombasa to Singapore by way of the Seychelles, described by Wesley Feilding. She was sailing bald-headed, her top-masts shipped presumably due to earlier incidents described elsewhere.

Her owner at the time was John Hopkins Marine Lab in Monterey CA, an offshoot of Stanford University. During the time I was aboard the captain was Omar Darr, who previously owned her during her Honolulu-Tahiti days.

We did some research in Monterey Bay in a large volume of water near the Monterey Marine Canyon which was strangely deficient in oxygen. During that time Te Vega also underwent extensive refitting at Bethleham Shipyard in San Francisco.

 

The (excellent) cook was caught smoking marijuana at the top of the mainmast, and fired. His replacement was a short, crew-cut sailor from 30 years at MSTS and at our first reprovisioning I counted eight cases of canned peas being loaded aboard. I tendered my resignation. Still, the time aboard Te Vega was idyllic and I still remember it well. I sometimes wonder if that piece of leather I crafted for the boom cradle is still there..

I worked on the Te Vega during the summer of 1957 with Omar Darr as Captain. The ship had a LOA of 135 feet and displaced about 240 tons.The ship had been dismasted and Darr chose not to replace the topmasts during the refit. There was a Cinerama movie crew on board during my time as a 15 year old galley boy and steward. 18 passengers crammedinto the ship was more than a bit much.The ship was built in Kiel in 1931 for, it was commonly accepted, Cornelius Crane of plumbing fame. I think I would stick with the Crane ownership. Darr sold the Te Vega in Fiji and the next owner charged off into unsurveyed waters, of which there are plenty around Fiji, and lost the ship in shallow water. After being raised and refitted it went to the Stanford ownership. That's about all I know.

I prefer to remember Tahiti as it was then.

Karl Polifka kmflyer@erols.com  05/31/00

 

09/25/2001

In July of 1987 I was part of the delivery crew that sailed "TeVega" over to Holland from Lunenburg Nova Scotia. My brother graduated from Landmark in 1987 that's how I met Capt. Steve Wedlock. I just Graduated from Florida Inst. if Tech with A marine tech degree. About ten days after meeting Capt.Wedlock I was in Lunenburg NS getting the vessel ready for the passage to Europe. We had a great sail across to the Channel Island where we stopped for a day before sailing the three days to the Masacant shipyard in Stelladam The Netherlands. I stayed on board until September before flying home to Boston.

Does anyone no what Capt. Wedlock is doing these days. If anyone reading knows anybody that was part of this crew Contact me at dreamcatcher_sail@hotmail.com or rbova@soundown.com.

Robert Bova

 

 

From: "Ivana Ostoic" <ivana@bubbledive.com> 9 Oct 2001

Te Vega is at the moment in La Spezia, and it is owned by Tanzi family.Last summer we did a cruise in the Adriatic Sea (Croatia). She is fully renowated and very comfortable. The crew is 11 sailors, and captain.

We had a great time

ivana

From: RWymbs@aol.com
Date: Fri, 23 Aug 2002 19:32:13 EDT

Sailed on Vega for a year during WW II, also knew her well and small boat
racer in Los Angeles Harbor before war.  She was NOT owned by Goering, she's
NOT a topsail schooner - she's a gaff rigged schooner, Te Vega was NOT her
name before the war - the old-time deep-sea sailing Warrant Bosun and Bosun
1st class during war named her that - tough duty, wild duty at times - did a
dangerous, hard job in noble style, blow high, blow low - and I was aboard,
sand and varnish, scrub and paint (with dove gray ENAMEL), worm, parcel and
serve, wear ship, tack ship, reef and hold on.
I
  e-mail, rwymbs@aol. 

 

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